ME – WE: WE – ME

ME – WE: WE – ME

In every religion, marriage heavily emphasise on the ‘big shift’; making the big move. We are forced to acknowledge the imminent change in status, from ‘ME’ to ‘WE’.  Be it the Christian couple saying ‘I do’, or the Muslim tradition of accepting ‘Qubool hai’ or the traditional Hindu Saptapadi; they signify only one thing, I am no longer ‘Me’. From this moment on I take the big step and acknowledge the life of ‘We’.

Christian weddings have the tradition of hosting a bachelor party. Known as a Stag Party ( USA and UK) or Buck’s night ( In Australia)  which is held for the” to be married” groom, before he enters the  holy matrimony  to celebrate his ‘last night of freedom’ and bachelorhood. They have something called a Bridal shower for the soon to be married girl, which used to be a traditional ceremony. The girl received gifts from family and friends, things she may need in her future life. In this generation, even the girls hang  out with their gal pals and enjoy their last night of freedom. In this generation we tend to marry at leisure, after living a few years of independent working life. In the western world, almost everyone marries more than once, and almost everyone has a pre-nuptial agreement signed and sealed. The threat of divorce looms large, even before they make their vows of eternal togetherness.  All these pre-nuptial agreements, over enthusiastic ‘stag nights’ predict a failed marriage and gives this mind shift of ‘me to we’ a very small window of opportunity to fructify.

“Marry knowing that it is for love and not money. This prenuptial agreement (also known as a pre-marital agreement) allows you to plan how you will divide your current and future wealth between you and your husband, wife or partner should you decide to divorce or separate in the future. It will help you control your ownership of important assets such as your house, sentimental possessions and your business.”  Lawyers have this pre-designed agreement, offered to the clients for 44 Euros! Kind of preordained, right? ‘We’ has zero chance of survival because the ‘me’ is already cognizant of the ephemeral life of ‘we’.

I don’t think Muslims have a ‘stag party’ tradition.  Moreover, this religion accepts polygamy. Even the laws of remarriage for women are not very stringent. They have a philosophy and practice which is different from the rest.

Let me come to our Indian, Hindu weddings; we never had anything like a prenuptial agreement. I do not remember ever having a ‘stag party’ tradition either.  Our upbringing was such that the girls were prepared for this mind shift right from our childhood. My parents had the same advice for us sisters, ‘That’s your family now, your first home. What they believe and practice is what you abide by.’  Education, ambition all were cast away in the wake of upholding this one relationship. Despite having complete awareness of the trials and strife that came along with this mind shift, the ‘me to we’ mind shift was natural. In a married life, nothing stays hunky-dory for long, but jumping to divorce for every disagreement or difference of opinion was never the option.  We were taught to make it work, this was no longer a ‘me’ scenario. Everything automatically became a ‘we’. We agree to disagree and walk the middle ground. Except for exacting situations ‘we’ survived. We fight, come close to parting ways, we are on the brink of killing the spouse, almost everything one can imaginably think of, happens; yet me survive the ‘we’.

However, the rising divorce rates in our country today, tell a very different tale. The advice our parents gave us was always for the girls. The result is; disillusioned mothers egged their girls to fight for their own rights, demand an equal share and prove that they could compete with the boys. To make matters worse, we, as parents, failed to teach the boys how to behave or how to be a co-operative, respecting adult. Thus, men are clueless and women are outraged. Gone are the days when women accept or follow anything that is thrust upon them. They are independent and free spirited women capable of making a mark in this competitive world. They want to succeed in both the worlds and refuse to give up on their dreams and ambitions. Like for every other belief; even for marriage, Indians find the western culture more worthy and adaptable. We want a married life, but a life, preferably with zero encumbrances and minimum sacrifice too. Else, we are very willing to walk out of the marriage, the willingness to live the ‘me’ life is far more alluring than having to live a burdened ‘we’ life. Thus, the increasing interest in prenups amongst the youth of India, especially amongst the affluent citizens.  My master says, ‘Married life is all about heart and ego!’. It used to be about our hearts and his ego then, now it is all about ego, his and hers.

We have adapted very well to the ways of the west. We have bridal showers and stag parties now. We have started to draw up pre-nuptial agreements, maybe not as flamboyantly as the westerners do, but we are not far away. Today, with great trepidation and discomfort we give marriage a thought; and we ensure that we don’t give up on the ‘me’, ever. We are unwilling to risk the loss of ‘me’ at any cost. It seems to be a very big sacrifice, a steep price to pay for a life which we are vehemently running away from.

That’s what it is coming to today, we have stopped teaching our children a life of togetherness, sacrifice and acceptance, which is what a life of ‘we’ really demands. Instead, we teach them to fight for their rights, be unyielding, be bold and ambitious enough to choose the ‘me’ over ‘we’.  We have walked the whole nine yards; from ‘Me to We’ and today we prefer ‘We to Me’.

The above saga stemmed from my stoic refusal to learn driving! I miss out on many things because of my immobile status. I have to ask my husband to be my chauffeur. Incase he is busy or not in the mood to drive then I am stuck at home. I agree it is an inconvenience. I also agree that my husband will be the happiest person if I learn to drive (he can make me run his errands too!).  I am tempted too, it is a very freeing thought to be mobile and do your own things  without having to ask anyone. Yet, this dropping; picking and shopping together is probably the only ‘We’ errand we have today. The day I begin to drive this will also be gone, I run my errands; I don’t have to ask him and I may very soon stop telling too! He is busy with his life, I am busy with mine, children with their lives, and with a different time schedule and his extreme travelling, we have no common time, apart for these drops and picks! This is when we catch up on what is happening in our ‘me’ lives! I definitely am not risking losing out on this time.  He gets irritated, I get angry; we agree to disagree and it goes on… Still, no driving for me, ever!