Warangal – Andhra Pradesh

I can go on endlessly about my country.  This time it is about a small place called Warangal. This is a town in Andhra Pradesh state, about 175 km north of Hyderabad, the capital city. This is a politically active region of the state and suffers because of the recurring strikes, dharnas (protest shows). Yet it has retained its rustic charm and has definite air of mystery and enigma. People are loud and soft in the same breath. It is a place full of contradictions. My country is such, the whole length and breadth of it; full of good –bad, tradition-modernity, myths- truth.

Warangal happens to another such town on the brink of breaking tradition yet trying to retain its cultural values. We took a taxi from Hyderabad, at around 5 in the morning. It is a 4-5 hours journey. The main attraction of Warangal is its 1000 pillar temple. There is neither a duplicate nor anything close to this in the whole world. I had visited this temple when I was barely 7 years old; and it left an indelible mark.  This trip was to relive that memory and see the rush of adrenalin on my kids faces when they would see this unimaginable beauty. The Warangal fort, which is in semi ruins now was another place of interest for me, that I wanted my kids to see.

The journey began in a bad way; we got a horrible driver with no driving sense. He broke all records, drove at a break neck speed, his hand never left the horn and the sound was deafening. We all had a splitting head ache.  The kids began to complain, they were getting angry, irritable, tired and weary .I was regretting this decision of mine. Only a wonder of the world may pacify my battered kids and this temple was a religious, historical, architectural monument; a far cry from a wonder of the world genre! After the arduous journey, imagine my dismay when I saw a miniature temple complex and the driver insisting, “THIS IS THE 1000 PILLAR Temple, madam!” I was crestfallen; the children looked at me with murderous rage. God! For a few fleeting seconds I saw Yama (The Hindu God of Death) in front of meJ.

We later found out that the Archeological survey of India had dismantled a part of the temple, comprising of almost 400 pillars! And the remaining 600 pillars are tightly knit to form the walls. They definitely look far less than 600 in number. The temple is star shaped and has a huge NANDI (Lord Shiva’s mode of transport). The guide took us through the entire complex giving us the history in great detail. This is a temple which dates back to 750AD- 1325 AD. Till date the temple is breathtakingly beautiful and intact. This is the only temple which faces south, and the Nandi too looks eastwards only here.  Usually Hindu temples face east and the Nandi looks westwards. The guide also mentioned that the whole city, the original Warangal was carved out of one rock in the 13th century.

Finally, I did get to see the awe struck look on my children’s face. The sheer magnitude of our cultural richness and our achievements humbled my son.  With all our technological advancements we still fall short in comparison to what our ancestors created centuries ago. It was a successful trip and we returned very content despite the bad beginning. You also please do not miss it for anything. The other places of interest are A Kali temple on a hilltop, a serene lake called Pakhal Lake about 45-50km from Warangal and a Jain temple too.  The fort I already mentioned above is another must visit site.